Independent Instructor Training
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- adi essex advanced driver training chemsford braintree
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NO CONTRACT - NO UPFRONT PAYMENTS

Personal Instructor Training(PDI), Advanced Driving Instructor(ADI) Working throughout Essex, Braintree, Colchester, Chelmsford, Witham and Basildon.

HERE’S THE SHOCKING TRUTH THE LARGER COLLEGES AND DRIVING ESTABLISHMENTS DON’T WANT YOU TO HEAR.

If you are thinking of becoming a driving instructor or have had lessons and are thinking of joining a driving school, let me tell you how you might save lots of heartache, time and importantly hundreds maybe thousands of pounds in training and franchise fees.

Section one

This first section is dedicated to individuals who are considering becoming Driving Instructors.

Here are a few things for you to consider that the Driving School or Training Establishment might use to get your signature or hard earned money from you.

The initial interview

Once you have made that important decision to become a driving instructor either as a lifelong ambition, redundancy or as a result of very good advertising, you may possibly visit the driver training establishment or attend one of the companies with slick induction personnel that might be very persuasive at getting you to either sign an agreement or part with large sums of money.

ADI 14

Quote: DSA ADI 14 page 2

You’re thinking of becoming a driving instructor?

This booklet aims to tell you everything you need to know about the qualification and registration process.  Read it carefully before going ahead.  If you do decide to proceed, you should keep this booklet for future reference.

During your initial interview you might have been given the opportunity to read or purchase an ADI 14 (entitled; your road to becoming an Approved Driving Instructor), this is in the ADI Starter Pack and aims to tell you everything you need to know about the qualification and registration process. Read it carefully before going ahead. If you then decide to proceed, you should keep the booklet for future reference. You can purchase the ADI 14 starter pack from the DSA at www.dsa.gov.uk

The ADI 14 gives you the insights and information needed to come to a balanced decision whether to go ahead or not.

If the individual conducting the initial interview has not mentioned, shown or given you a copy of the ADI 14 then maybe there is something in the booklet that they do not want you to read or see.  Why would they not show you this booklet? It is fundamental in your decision making.  Were you given a copy of the ADI 14 or even told of its existence? If not, why not. Are they hiding something? Maybe they do not want you to ask the questions on page 10.  It might be too embarrassing for them.

In the Starter Pack there is a separate booklet listing those trainers who are on the DSA Official Register of Driving Instructor Training (ORDIT).  Ask your trainer to show you his/her name. 

Quote: DSA ADI 14 page 9

Having identified a trainer, however, you are advised not to sign a contract unless you are satisfied that the training course meets your needs – seek legal advice if in doubt.

Were you informed that you only get three attempts at the Part 2 and Part 3 tests?   If not: I wonder why not?

Were you informed that you have to wait 2 years from when you passed Part 1 before you can start all over again?  If not: I wonder why not?

100% Pass rate, Guaranteed Pass

Yes; of course they might say that.  It’s what you want to hear.

They may offer you a guaranteed pass if you sign today and pay thousands of pounds upfront.  You may get the training you paid for, that’s; Part 1 training, Part 2 training and 40 hours Part 3 training, you might not hear them promise you a Part 3 pass,  if you are not successful you might be offered the course all over again until you do pass.

Here’s the clever bit; because you are offered the course all over again, you are deemed never to have failed.  If you decide to stop training it is not because you failed, it’s because you decided not to continue training.  That is where the 100% pass rate comes from.

The Training Establishment may encourage you to take your first attempt at Part 3 as soon as possible (to gain valuable experience, in failing) the reason for this is to make the time between your failing and starting all over again as long as possible, they hope you will have found other employment by then and will leave them alone.

Warning

If you attend any interview or induction DO NOT sign anything or part with large sums of money until you have taken the documents away and had a legal professional read through all documentation and checked any small print.  If they will not let you take the documentation away, could there be something in the document that they do not want the legal professional to see?

Remember

It is your future, your time, your money and your dreams. If they say they have a special offer this week and you have to sign up now, and then run away. If they will not let you take the agreement away to get it verified then ask yourself what are they hiding? You can always return later if the offer is that good.

These people giving presentations at induction sessions are similar to double-glazing or timeshare salesman in that they are very persuasive and very good at their job, and there job is making you part with your hard-earned money.

Some may even advise you to take out a Career Development Loan. Why!! Why would you take out a loan for £3,000 or more to pay for training that only 28 percent of people pass? You may be unsuccessful and still have to pay the loan back.  It would make more sense to me to raise the money first, and then start training, or have training as you get the money; therefore you can control your spending, then start and stop when it suits you.  Do not be put under pressure to take out a loan.

The driving assessment

You might be required to have a driving assessment; this may take place in their car (because it should have dual controls) with as many as two other Potential Driving Instructors in the back.

It is very unlikely you would fail an assessment drive because you are worth £3,000 or more to them. Are they on a commission if you sign today? Well, that's for you to decide.

They may get ‘satisfied pupils’ to come in and tell you how wonderful the experience has been and you have made a good choice if you sign and join today. 

If you are not allowed to take home copies of paperwork that you are asked to sign, then do not sign it. They might tell you that other Training Establishments are after a copy of the material and it is not allowed to leave the office, the reason you are not allowed to take it home, could be, because you might find some reason for not signing it.

If they insist, then get them to fax it to your legal expert for reading.

Payment for training

Training Establishments might require you to pay everything upfront with little or no chance of a refund if your circumstances change and you want to get your money back.

Training Establishments might offer free training as long as you remain with the school.  When you try to leave and hand in your resignation, you may be faced with the training fees in one lump sum.  Again this can run into thousands of pounds.

A better way

There are training establishments that offer Pay As You Train; normally these are independent trainers (like me) that have built up a reputation in their local area, you pay for each and every lesson at the end of each lesson or practical session. If at the end of the lesson you are not happy with the training given then do not book further lessons, it’s as easy as that.  Surely this is a better system?

Some questions you need to ask.  Quote: DSA ADI 14 page 10

Payment

What is their refund policy?

Will you get any refunded fees if you fail or are unable to continue with the course at any time, particularly if it is for reasons beyond your control?

What are your rights under the contract?

Does the course allow you to pay for the training in stages?

If you pay for a complete course, will you get any refund of fees if you fail all three attempts at Part 2?

When you are qualified

What will your set-up costs be?

If you leave a school to operate as a self-employed ADI, are there any restrictions in your contract (e.g. preventing you from working in a certain area)?

Are you tied to the school for a set period?

These questions are asked by the DSA not by me

Part 1 training package

Training Establishments might ask for hundreds of pounds for Part 1 training, this is OK if you get hundreds of pounds worth of training material, mock tests and tuition on how to pass your Part 1 exam. Make sure you get what you pay for.

You will need certain books, manuals and DVD’s to prepare you for your Part 1 test, someone has to pay for these, I suggest that the minimum books required are:

            The Highway Code

            Driving the Essential Skills

            The Official DSA guide to learning to drive

            The Driving Instructors Handbook

            Know Your Traffic Signs

            The Official DSA Theory Test for ADI’s (questions and answers)

Training Establishments might insist you attend and pay for evening classes to study - WHY? If you are not capable of setting aside time to read a book at home then you may struggle when you get to Part 3 training.

To keep costs down, why not join your local library and borrow the books and DVD’s.  It is true, you may need to purchase the most up-to-date books for reference, but you can do that once you qualify.

Part 2 training package

After the initial driving assessment (which you will normally pass) training should be done in the car you will take your test in.

If you already have a suitable car for test then this could be used for training.

If you use the Training Establishments car, how much time will you get for practice? And will you get written confirmation that it will be available for the day of your test?

Part 2 is a practical test and, predominantly, training should be done in the car, practicing driving (not, predominately, in a classroom talking about driving). You may have more than yourself and your trainer in the car, the DSA recommend that there should be no more than two trainees per one trainer.

Part 3 training package

You may be told to “take your first test ‘for practice’, no one ever passes first time, so it will be good experience for you to see how the test works and what is expected.”  You might get good experience on how to fail, because that is probably what you are going to do.

Surely it is the responsibility of your trainer to simulate the test by role-play to determine precisely what is going to happen on the test.  You need to find a trainer who is good at acting, because that is exactly what the Examiner is doing. 

You should experience the Part 3 test by your trainer acting out a mock test, this should be conducted on a 1 to 1 basis, that way you should have no doubt what the test is about. 

The Part 3 test is nothing like teaching a pupil, pupils will do their best to learn and improve, it might take awhile but they are trying.  The SE ADI may use all tricks and traits at his disposal to take control away from you, pupils will not do this, not deliberately anyway.

All training should take place with no more than two trainees per ADI in-car training. If there are more than two trainees, inform the DSA, and the trainer and training establishment may be removed from the ORDIT register.  To remain on the ORDIT register a Code of Practice has to be signed and abided by.

Training confirmation

If you are not satisfied with your training then do not sign to say that you are, because if you feel the need to complain at a later date, all paper work may be placed before you with your signature on it saying you were happy and satisfied with the training.  You may be asked to sign the contract, franchise agreement or training confirmation just because everyone else has, DO NOT SIGN anything you are not completely happy with.

ADI 21T.        If you decide to apply for a trainee licence you need to complete form ADI 21T, this is a declaration that you have undertaken a training programme of at least 40 hours with a qualified ADI. You sign the declaration to say you have received training, if you wasted time in a café, lessons were cut short or started late then do not sign to say you received quality training, remember you are paying for this training so make sure you get what you paid for.

If you decided on the trainee licence then you have two options;

Supervision from your sponsoring ADI for 20% of all lessons you give.  A record must be kept on the form ADI 21S signed by both you and your supervising ADI.          Or

Additional training for a minimum of 20 hours.  A record must be kept on the form ADI 21AT signed by both you and your ADI

Have you been sold the trainee licence as part of the overall fee? 

If you paid for the additional training in advance then they have taken away the supervision option, you can always pay for the additional training when you need it.  Training Establishments might take your money for the extra 20 hours and insist you go on a trainee licence with their driving school.  If you do not take the extra 20 hours training within 3 months then the money might be forfeited. It is your money so do not pay for anything in advance until you know what you are paying for.

You do not have to have additional training with the same training establishment or trainer; any trainer can sign off the paperwork on completion of training. 

One problem with paying in advance is that your option for supervision has been taken away from you; you may be sold this in advance as another way of getting your money up front with little or no chance of getting it back if you change your mind. 

Trainee licence

The trainee licence allows you to be legally paid for giving driving instruction, but should not be regarded as a sole means of making a living or as an alternative to registration as an ADI. It is not essential to have a licence in order to prepare for the Part 3 test, but it is an option that is available to assist in preparing for the examination.

To get all information regarding the trainee licence you need to read DSA ADI 14 pages 19, 20 and 21.

Quote: DSA ADI 14 page 21

You should not sign the declaration on the form unless you have had the training or supervision described, or you and the sponsoring ADI will be committing an offence under Section 174 of the Road Traffic Act 1998. Remember in no circumstances should you sign a blank form.

These questions are asked by the DSA not by me

Statistics

During the induction you may be told what the pass rates and statistics are for the training establishment.  Ask for a breakdown of these statistics; what are the statistics for Parts 1, 2 and 3, ask for proof. Part 3 is statistically the more difficult to pass, what are the statistics for this test. If they are legitimate they will be pleased to show you.

Part of the package may include the £200 registration fee that you need to pay the DSA after you pass your Part 3 test.  So: you pay for the £200 registration fee upfront, the Training Establishment may hold on to that money.  If you are one of the 72 per cent that do not pass the Part 3 test you may not see that money again.  Ensure you get information on what the fee includes.  Find out how much and when will funds be returned to you, if you are unsuccessful at any stage of training. 

You may need extra Part 3 training with an independent trainer, and then if you are successful with your Part 3 test you can claim your £200 registration fee back from the Training Establishment and they may put you down on their statistics as another pass, very clever.

Some questions you need to ask.  Quote: DSA ADI 14 page 10

The Trainer

What ADI grade is your trainer? (ask to see his ADI 40, check test report) if he/she is grade 6 he/she will be more than willing to show it to you.

What success rate does the trainer have? Ask for evidence

Do they know what the national pass rates are for each part?  See page 7 of the ADI 14

The Course

How much is it going to cost, how long is it and what does it cover?

Does it include books and test fees and does it address your particular needs?

What extra support will you get if you fail an attempt?

Will extra attempts cost you anymore?

What happens if you need more than the training that is offered?

Is an assessment of your suitability to become an ADI carried out beforehand?

What teaching methods are used?

Will there be any other trainees to share the car with you?

Will you be given dates for each of your lessons at the start of the course?

These questions are asked by the DSA not by me


Section two

This section is for those who have already started training.

You need to read this:

If you’ve already paid a small fortune for a driving instructor training course, or blown your hard-earned money on the latest advert that entices you to become a driving instructor, you need to read the following section very closely, because you may have been misinformed and misled, force-fed a boatload of useless nonsense that is actually blocking you from your dreams of becoming an ADI. 

And I should know.. Because I’ve heard stories like this from many PDI’s that have failed in their attempt at becoming an ADI.  Very few are equipped to deal with this failure.  Many are traumatised. Some end up heartbroken, in debt or have their life and dreams shattered.  If none of this has happened to you yet, you’re lucky .. Or maybe not.  It could be your turn next just around the corner, and if it is you may need to talk to me.

If deep down you know you are convinced you are not getting the best training for your money then please email me with your story.

 .. I want you to know the truth about Driving Instructor Training.

My name is Tony Byiast, and for many years I’ve worked as a Driving Instructor Trainer in the driver training industry.  And do you know what … 72 per cent of those that start training never pass the final hurdle of getting that coveted green badge.

It’s true … they spend about the same amount of money as the 28 per cent that passed, but maybe due to lack of commitment (possibly on the training establishments’ part) poor training, not enough, or even wrong training, they never reached that elusive pass on their DSA test.

Has that happened to you?

Have you ever wondered why you never received that pass your course trainer promised you? Or fulfilled your dream the induction presentation team of ‘time-share and double-glazing salesmen’ promised you?  WELL, I WILL TELL YOU WHY:

It’s because driver training establishments are not necessarily teaching you to pass!!!

Oh sure, they may tell you that you are up to standard and ready for your test … the sort of thing that you cannot actually see or measure very easily, unless it’s against other individuals in the same boat as yourself.  But what about the things you can see and feel, the way you feel at the end of a lesson, probably depressed and humiliated.  Are you always keen to start a training session, eager to learn more, understand what has been taught and know how to get the most out of training?

Probably not, because maybe some of what you have been taught is counterproductive, unnecessarily time consuming, and possibly just plain wrong.

Not only are you wasting you money, about £3.000+ but you’re wasting your time as well, probably two years worth.  But most important of all, you are being robbed of your dreams, dreams of becoming a fully qualified ADI, dreams of supporting your family, dreams of financial security.

Well, I’ve written this document to tell you that now, you can have your dreams, without having to pay huge amounts of money up front or sign complicated contracts and franchise agreements that are mostly for the benefit of the writer.

Let me explain …

Driver Training Establishments don’t necessarily want you to pass; there is a huge profit to be made out of instructor training, if everyone passed that went through their doors the industry might become saturated and they would possibly have no work.  Sure, some of the brighter students get through the net that is because they might get training from a trainer that really cares about you and your dreams, trainers like me. 

My training is based on the John Farlam Smartdriving system of success-based training.  (To find out more about John Farlam visit his website at www.smartdriving.co.uk.) John has been in the driver training industry for many years and has designed a system for teaching learners, where at the end of each and every lesson you feel as if you want to stay in the car and get more training, as opposed to wanting to cut the session short because you are confused and not making progress.

Instructor Training Establishments might give you a training pack, included in your fee, which consists of a set of briefing notes and picture layouts. OK, they give you a sheet of paper that has the layout of the subject you are teaching and possibly a few words that may act as prompts, but then you are expected to rely on your memory to get you through.

Visual Teaching System

With the John Farlam, Smartdriving Visual Teaching System (VTS) I will show you a teaching system for every briefing.  Using the Smartdriving VTS you should master the technique for every PST needed to assist you in passing your Part 3 test and which should also be used in your day to day lessons.  When PDI’s first come to me, many slaving away in the car trying to get it right and not get anywhere near test standard, I tried it and it works.  And I will teach you how it works.

It is my intention that you should be capable of delivering a complete briefing on every subject within the DSA Part 3 syllabus.

I get many PDI’s call me up for help.  At first I have to convince them that it is not all confusing and bit by bit the mist clears and we start piecing together a system which was radically different to anything being taught by other instructor training establishments (apart from John Farlam obviously).

A system which ordinary people use to make extraordinary progress, and in less time than had previously been thought possible.

Visible and measurable success

Each and every PDI that has called me for assistance or taken a structured course of instruction has made more visible and measurable success during a quality course of instruction than they ever thought possible. Briefings are clearer, teaching a learner is more productive and fun than before and the Part 3 test is not so confusing.

The big difference is the way they feel. They feel as if they know what to expect from the Part 3 test, and let’s not kid ourselves that it is the same as teaching real learners, there is a technique on how to pass your test and just because you get a few learners through their practical test doesn’t mean you can pass your Part 3 test.

You will get a dedicated trainer whose sole purpose is to do their best to get you through your Part 2 or Part 3 test. You will be taught the three core competences in a way that you should understand them.  You should understand the meaning of the ADI 26 and how to get ticks in the satisfactory column, plus understand the difference between phases one and two.

Anyone who’s ever undertaken a driving instructor programme, but not had the results they wanted, needs to book a lesson with my Academy right now.

It doesn’t matter whether you’ve had an attempt at Part 3 already, if you’re on a trainee licence or someone who’s just thinking of taking Part 3, you might need specialist training or you may not get through!  What you should discover during your course is something that will cause you to think about your Part 3 as just another test that you need to pass to get to that green badge.

Some questions you need to ask.  Quote: DSA ADI 14 page 10

Flexibility

Can you train whilst carrying on with your existing job?

Will you need longer if you are trying to do two things at once?

These questions are asked by the DSA not by me


Section three

This section is dedicated to informing you of what my Training Academy can offer.

Here are a few things that I intend to teach you during your structured course of training:

How to:

Give a satisfactory briefing on all subjects

Understand what the three core competences are and how to apply them

Control the test and not let your Part 3 feel as if you are on a runaway train.

Know the difference between phase one and phase two.

Understand the ADI 26 completely and know what the SE ADI is looking for.

Know the time scale of the test and move from one time period to the other seamlessly

Look forward to, and enjoy your training. 

And lots, lots more

All those wasted months of training will be a distant memory

Just one thing I want to be clear about; this training will still expect a lot of hard work from you, there is no miracle cure, you will still need to work hard between lessons, but this time you should understand what you are studying and want to learn more.  The light at the end of the tunnel should get brighter.

Teaching learners should be an enjoyable experience, not just driving round for an hour and getting your money at the end. You will actually teach them a specific subject, just like your Part 3, and your pupil should learn quicker as a result. I will teach you how to get the best from a lesson and how you can practice for your Part 3 test at the same time and get paid for it. 

Sounds too good to be true.

So how much is this going to cost? Well for a start you will not be asked to pay anything up front, (unless you take the residential option,) and you will not have to sign a contract that will tie you in for years and repay the training fees over many months, sometimes years.  Sometimes Driving Establishments offer free training as long as you remain part of the company, if you decide to leave then you could get a hefty bill that you have to settle for the full amount of training you had.  This could run into thousands of pounds. 

Walk away and pay nothing

I only want you to pay for my training if it works for you. You pay for the training you get at the end of the lesson. So here’s the deal... Book a two hour lesson with me, if you can’t feel any improvement or if you have learnt nothing, then don’t pay, just walk away and pay nothing.  So far this has never happened, if I was not confident that my training was effective then I wouldn’t make such a statement.

However, I will be very surprised if you even think of not booking another lesson once you have started training with me.  But I appreciate you can’t know that yet, so the guarantee is there to set your mind at rest.

To book a lesson with me or one or my specially picked ORDIT trainers call me (Tony Byiast) on 07763 550380 or via my email address tony@byiast.co.uk. If the lines are busy, please try again later. I could be teaching, as demand for my courses are busy at the moment. Please leave a contact number and I will get back to you as soon as I can.

The Authors Experience

Army

Tony was in charge of the largest Recovery Training Establishment in the British Army.  He personally undertook the training of Officers, Senior NCO Military and Civilian Instructors.

As Warrant Officer Class One (ASM) Recovery, he was the most Senior Soldier in the British Army at his trade.  He was responsible for REME recovery training and policy making Worldwide.

Retired from the Army in April 1998.

GKN Defence

Job Title:  Technical Course Designer and Instructor.

Tony was an expert on the Warrior, Piranha and Saxon recovery vehicles.  He gave technical expert advice on the design and development of the Desert Warrior (Recovery) and delivered courses in Kuwait and Qatar via interpreters.

He also designed, developed and delivered a similar course to the Swiss Armed Forces.

CV:     For my full CV take a look at my website, www.byiast.co.uk

Licences

Cat A              (Motorcycle)

Cat B              (Car)

Cat B + E       (Car + Trailer)

Cat C + E      (LGV, HGV Class 1)

Cat H              (Tracked Licence)

Driving Instructor Qualifications

ORDIT Registered (Ref No 0288)

Diamond Advanced Instructor

DSA Grade 6

Cardington Special Driving Test for ADIs Grade A

Pass Plus Registered

DIA Diploma in Driving Instruction

MODULE 1: Legal Obligations and Regulations

MODULE 2: Management, Practices and Procedures

MODULE 3: Vehicle Maintenance and Mechanical Principles

MODULE 4: Driving Theory, Skills and Procedures

MODULE 5: Teaching, Practices and Procedures

Other Qualifications

NVQ Level 5 in Business Management

Essex County Council Contracts

Tony is an advanced driver trainer for the Essex National Driver Improvement Scheme designed to assess client’s attitudes towards their own and other people’s driving and then improve their practical driving skills.

Tony carries out an assessment of council workers driving skills; this includes a 30 minute commentary drive to the highest standard and risk assessment of 700 lease car holders on behalf of the Essex County Council.

Tony caries out Trailer Handling assessments on behalf of the Essex County Council.

ELCAS

Byiast Driving Academy is an Approved Learning Provider for the Enhanced Learning Credit Scheme for the Ministry of Defence,

The ELC scheme is designed to provide assistance to Service personnel to help towards higher-level learning. ELC is an integral part of, and results in, the cost effective achievement of a nationally recognised qualification at Level three or above on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) (England and Wales), a Level six or above on the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF) or, if pursued overseas, an approved international equivalent qualification.


Section four

Franchises & Contracts

This section is dedicated to Franchise Agreements and Contracts, I refer to Franchise Agreements and Contracts alike as some Driving Schools prefer to use a Franchise Agreement and some prefer the Contract.  I will try and show you what to look for in the small print and their meanings of certain words and phrases.

Quote from DSA ADI 14 page 10

Do not enter a franchise agreement with any operator unless you have thoroughly read the small print. If you have any doubts at all, do not sign anything without seeking professional advice from a solicitor or national association.  

Franchising might be a good idea if someone is looking to start up a new business. You might be more likely to succeed initially with the assistance of an established driving school.  This is mainly because you should have the support of the parent company to fall back on.

Franchising might be good for those who aren’t sure about initially being independent, because of the potential risks involved in starting on your own, advertising, getting pupils and maintaining a healthy diary.

Undertake plenty of research and talk to existing franchisees; they should know what the training was like, how much support you’ll get and how profitable the business is likely to be.  Also, it is important to have your legal agreement reviewed by a franchise legal specialist.

Initially you should expect an induction programme plus theoretical and practical training. After that you should get regular visits and plenty of support from the driving school.

Franchise agreement

If you decide to work for a driving school you may have to sign a franchise agreement. This is quite normal and there are many reasons why this is done, but there might be pitfalls as well, there are establishments that may try to pray on your inexperience and eagerness to join, they know that it might be very easy to get your signature on that sheet of paper. BE VERY CAREFULL of what you are asked to sign.

What to look for in a Franchise Agreement

What is the length of time the agreement is for? If you are tied into a long franchise agreement then you have to consider what you are letting yourself in for. Remember, generally, franchise agreements are mostly for the benefit of the establishment that wrote it, not for you.

It is understandable that the Company might need some kind of written agreement with the franchisee to deter you from building up a large client base and then starting your own driving school in competition

However: you might need some kind of ‘get out’ clause if you feel unable to work with the driving school, such as; ill-health or personal reasons. If you have to spend time in hospital, become pregnant and want to take a few months off, you may still have to pay your weekly franchise fee.

You might be tied into an agreement for a fixed period without a break clause, if you then decide to leave early you may have to pay ALL the remaining fees owed in one lump sum, and this could run into thousands of pounds.

Franchise fees

You pay franchise fees to the Driving School because you want to use their expertise, marketing, advertising and reputation to give you an instant start into the lucrative market of learner drivers.

If you decide to be independent. It is unlikely you will be able to get a full diary straight away, unless you are very good at marketing and advertising. It takes quite a while for a good instructor to establish themselves and get a good reputation.

If you are already in employment then you have an advantage, you can start slowly and gradually build up your client base.  (My advice is to keep your day job until you pass your Part 3 test.)

However, if you need to start work as a driving instructor immediately then you may have to join an established driving school and work under their banner.

Possible benefits of working with a large driving school.

Their logo and car may have instant recognition and their reputation (good or bad) should be passed on to you.

Advertising should already be well established.

You have a group of individuals; both management and fellow franchisees to call on if you need assistance or guidance.

Possible downfalls of a large driving school

You may become just another instructor on their books.

The more instructors and franchisees then the Driving School might not be able to spend as much time dealing with your individual problems (which you may have initially).

You may not get the feeling of belonging as there could be so many other instructors that you may feel like a small fish in a large pond.

Possible benefits of a smaller driving school (10 cars or less)

Everyone in the Driving School should know you, and they all have a vested interest in your training, because your progress and instructional skills are taken personally.

The Driving School may occasionally monitor your lessons and give advice if needed.

You can call the office and sometimes visit out of hours if you have issues that are bothering you.

You become part of the driving school family.

Possible downfalls of a small driving school

No guarantee you will get enough pupils initially.

Advertising may be represented by the size of the school.

The Driving School might be new to franchising and you could be the guinea pig.

Driving school provisions

What the Driving School might provide:

Roof cone payment

If the Driving School provides the roof cone, who will pay for it? Is it part of the agreement that it remains the property of the Driving School and you hand it back at the end of the agreement, or would you have to pay for it? You may have to pay an inflated price if you lose your roof cone, so take care of it.

Roof cone use

When are you expected to display the roof cone? During lessons naturally: But what about after you have finished lessons for the day? Your contract might insist that the roof cone remains on the vehicle at ALL times, even if you are using the vehicle for private use.  You might have to leave it on overnight, if it goes missing because of this policy, who is expected to pay for the replacement?

Advertising

Who will organise, market and pay for advertising? If you are with a large driving school this should already be well established and there should be little for you to do.

With a small school you might need to place adverts in local newspapers or in shop windows you may even have to get walking the streets delivering leaflets, they all work to a degree.  The amount of work you do to advertise and generate business should be reflected in your weekly franchise fee.

Remember, when franchise fees are discussed it is normally weekly, so £200 means £200 weekly

Assistance in the day-to-day running of the business

What are you expected to do for the franchise fee you pay? If the only phone number provided and advertised is the school's number then they should take all calls and allocate the first lessons and timings on your behalf.

If a pupil is recommended to you personally and they call the office number how can you guarantee you will get your pupil or will they be allocated another instructor within the school?

If your phone number is advertised then you may receive calls during out of hours and at home. It may be best to use a mobile, as you might not want others in the house disturbed with your business calls

Dress code

What are the conditions of the dress code? You are expected to be smart and tidy at all times during working hours, but what about after you have finished work and need to use the car for private use? Does your Franchise Agreement insist that you are smartly dressed at all times when driving the school car, what about if you want to pop to the supermarket on Sunday morning to collect your paper? Or take the kids to football practice?

Franchise fees

They may start low and work up week by week until you are paying the full amount; sometimes it's in excess of £200 per week.

If you have been paying the full amount for some time, a revised lower franchise fee might be discussed and reviewed, you may get an offer that reduces your franchise fee by a certain amount each week.  The franchise fee may be reduced by a certain amount each week but it might not mean that you will not pay it all eventually.  It may be added up and you might be forced to pay it all off in one lump sum when you terminate your contract, the longer you stay with the driving school the more money you have to pay when you leave. Read your contract carefully and any additional paperwork you are asked to sign, get copies.

The franchisee fees might be put up for whatever reasons the Driving School decides, because there might be a clause saying fees will increase from time to time.  Does that mean they can put it up whenever and to whatever they want?

Accident and sickness insurance

You are advised to get accident and sickness insurance, otherwise how can the Driving School claim the franchise fees when you are in hospital? Because the franchise fee might still need to be paid, even if you are in hospital.  They are all heart aren’t they?

Holidays

How many ‘franchise free’ weeks are you getting? And when can you have them?

Free training?

If you received free training, then that might be added when you terminate your contract as well, again this could be hundreds or more likely thousands of pounds.  If you get ‘free’ training make sure it is free and make a note of how many training sessions you have had.  Get signatures for evidence.  There is no such thing as a free lunch.

Pupils lesson fees

Your Franchise Agreement might state that you can only charge pupils the price your Driving School advertises at, including free introductory lessons and promotions that you may not get paid for.  The Driving School might deliberately keep the prices low to attract new pupils, you get lots of pupils, but you might be working on minimum profit, if you refuse to take on the new pupils because they may be miles from your base location, you might not earn enough money to pay your franchise fees, you might find yourself in breach of contract. The Driving School might then produce evidence that they provided you with plenty of work but you refused to accept it.  Keep a list of all pupils referred to you, the date, location and prices.

The contract

There are many benefits in signing a contract and they are mostly for the benefit of the Driving School or Driver Training Establishment, it is not necessarily written for your benefit. However some schools insist that a contract is signed.

Possible benefits to the Driving School

They can make plans for you, for the duration of your contract

They can plan advertising and promotions for the duration of your contract.

They can employ office staff to deal with your needs.

Possible benefits to you

You have a known sum to pay each week.

There is security in continuity

Handing in your notice, or termination of contract

Your contract might have a clause; stating that you will not be able to teach for a certain amount of months after your contract has terminated or expired, it might also state a distance from your place of work as well, this might be to prevent you from taking all your pupils and starting up your own school in competition. 

This might seem very unreasonable as you may not have a livelihood as a driving instructor and may have to seek other employment until the time expires. You might think this is unfair, but if you sign a contract to say you will not teach for that duration of time then the law could be on the establishments’ side. Remember you are an adult and if you sign a contract then you have to abide by it.  So don’t sign it unless you are sure of its contents and clauses.

If you are seen teaching or it looks as if you are teaching within the set period, then you might find yourself in breach of contract even after you have left the driving school.

Termination

If the agreement is terminated in any way by you, or the Driving School terminates it for any breach of the agreement by you, then you may end up paying all fees due until expiry date.

If you are removed from the DSA register, for whatever reason and cannot be an instructor or you get a criminal record, your agreement may be terminated.

If you fail your Part 3 for the third time, your contract may be terminated.  And you have, as such, terminated the agreement; this means you might have to pay the full amount of franchise owed in one lump sum. Don’t complain if you signed to say you would pay.

If your agreement is terminated, what are you expected to return? Roof cone, mobile phone, pupils, cost of vehicle signs, promotional literature, names and addresses of pupils (now and in the future)

This works both ways

If the Driving School has spent hundreds sometimes thousands of pounds on your behalf in advertising and promotion to get you established, then you would expect them to get some or all of that investment back.

However; if you perceive there has been no additional increase in advertising or you have done your own leaflet drops and advertising then you could be aggrieved at having to pay for something you have not received. But if you signed to say you would pay, then you do not have a legal leg to stand on, it might seem immoral but it is legal.

Contract meanings

The contract might be written in English but it might as well be written in Martian, words and phrases that mean one thing to us might mean something completely different to the Driving School and legal professionals, but let there be no doubt that the contract might be written by legal professionals mostly for the benefit of the Driving School and NOT FOR YOU

Mobile phone

You may have to get a mobile phone to conduct your business, but the Franchise Agreement might state that you hand the mobile phone and is number to them when your contract terminates. So that they get all future business you personally generated.

Dating and signing the contract

You may decide to go ahead and agree to the contract (after you have had it verified). Before you sign the contract, you should make sure that there is a date at the bottom, because if you do not have a date, then, when you hand in your notice to leave or your contract is terminated, you may be presented with a contract signed by you, but the date might be much later than you thought and you may have to remain with the establishment longer. You may still have to pay your franchise fees up until your new date expires, do you think you will get pupils allocated to you once you have made it clear you want to leave? I will let you ponder that one. 

Witness signatures:  Schedules should be signed, dated, and attached to the contract. 

The contract paper – fax machine

If you are given a copy of the contract put through the fax machine, after a few months the paper may deteriorate and the print may fade.  When you need to produce it at a later date you may not be able to read it.  Take a photocopy but preferably, as a contract is a legal document, insist upon a separate contract, duly signed and dated Etc.

Every sheet

Make sure that every sheet is numbered and signed by both parties; if not then there is the opportunity of adding, or subtracting critical pages.

Other work

The contract might state that you are not allowed to take any other employment and must concentrate all efforts on the driving school.

You might not have enough pupils to earn enough money to pay your franchise fee, but you are not allowed to get another job either.

You might be unable to fulfil your franchise payments obligations, you may then be told you have breached your contract agreement and may have your franchise agreement terminated, which means you may have expensive legal bills and have to pay the full franchised amount outstanding in one lump sum.  You might get the offer to settle early if you pay a reduced sum in cash, this may still be in the thousands.  Make sure you inform the tax man of any cash paid and get a receipt.

My aim

My aim is to avoid you finding yourself in breach of contract with potential loss of valuable funds and expensive legal bills.  You might not think you need to know this now, but you just never know when this document might be of value to you, in your business or personal life. 

The driver training establishments have kept this information to themselves for long enough... with good reason... there is lots of money to be made from teaching PDI’s (whether you pass or not).

Now is the time when every PDI needs to gain access to the information within this document and perhaps with luck you will never have to use it.  But it is far better to have this knowledge and never use it, than to not have the knowledge, and one day get into a contract or franchise agreement and desperately wish you had not.

The information in this document has never been revealed to the general public before, and is not available in any book shop or from any other source. It has been written and prepared by myself, specifically to assist you, the PDI, in selecting the best trainer you can for the best possible training, money can buy. 

I hope this information has been helpful to you; my sole aim in producing this document is to help you fulfil your dreams and aspirations of becoming a driving instructor.

Good training establishments

I must point out that there are many, many Training Establishments that are a credit to the driving instructor industry and they would not hesitate to answer any or all of the questions posed within this document, I am trying to warn you to steer clear of those that would be embarrassed or evasive when asked certain types of questions.

Just because a Training Establishment or individual is ORDIT registered does not mean it will give the very best of training and value for money, you still need to do your homework and collect references.

It is now up to you to decide for yourself which path you wish to follow, if you feel this information has assisted you in your decision, or not, to become a driving instructor, please let me know. If you have already entered into an agreement that you wished you had not, then let the DSA know.  Also, if you are a member of one of the driving industry associations inform them. I recommend the Driving Instructors Association at Safety House, Beddington Farm Road, Croydon, CR0 4XZ; web site: www.driving.org they would be very interested in your story.  I do suggest you become a member if you need their assistance.

Being a driving instructor is one of the very best vocations you could ever want to be in, it is getting the best training for the money you payout that is the problem.

This document will never be complete, because I hear every week of individuals being misled or literally taken for a ride, if you can think of anything that may assist others from falling into a similar trap that you are in, please let me know and I may insert it into my next print.

Please let me know how you get on, and let me know of good trainers so that I can pass that information on to others.

I would like to hear about your experiences, both pleasant and unpleasant.   

Section five

THE OFFICIAL REGISTER OF DRIVING INSTRUCTOR TRAINING (ORDIT)

I have included a copy of the ORDIT Terms and Conditions for you to read, you can download a copy from the DSA website.

http://dsa.gov.uk/Documents/ordit/ORDIT_Terms.pdf.

I have highlighted sections that I feel you might find useful, if your trainer has not complied with the Terms and Conditions in the spirit as well as the letter and in an honest, moral and professional approach in all business practice, then if you complain to the DSA and the ORDIT registrar, the establishment might get removed from the register, and that might be very newsworthy to local papers and motoring organisations, the type of advertising not welcomed by the establishment.

Any person seeking training with an organisation or individual whose details are entered in the Register should be protected from unfair business practices and inferior training,

If you have complaints about the standard of training you have received from any of the establishments on the register that you cannot settle with the establishment itself, you may write to the DSA ORDIT Team, C/O the Driving Standards Agency, The Axis Building, 112 Upper Parliament Street, Nottingham NG1 6LP.

The BBC programme ‘Watchdog’ might also be keen to hear your story and to investigate establishments that have been removed from the register.

  

TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF ORDIT MEMBERSHIP

0.      DEFINITIONS

0.1      ‘ADI’ is a DSA Approved Driving Instructor.

0.2      ‘Inspector’ is a person accredited by the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) to carry out ORDIT testing of Trainers and Organisations in accordance with agreed ORDIT inspection guidelines and standards.

0.3      ‘Organisation’ is the individual or corporate body, which must be a recognised legal entity (i.e. sole trader, partnership, limited or public limited company) with a named Principal, to which ORDIT Membership is granted, subject to the terms and conditions herein being satisfied and adhered to.

0.4      ‘Premises’ are the places from which training is provided and/or training records are maintained by the Organisation and where correspondence can be addressed to by clients or other interested parties.

0.5      ‘Principal’ is the named senior person, authorised by the Organisation, responsible for ensuring that the terms and conditions of ORDIT Membership are adhered to.

0.6      ‘Prospective Trainer’ is an individual Trainer lacking experience who is allowed to give instructor training on behalf of an Organisation while awaiting ORDIT inspection subject to stringent regulations herein.

0.7      ‘Register’ and ‘ORDIT’ shall mean the Official Register of Driving Instructor Training.

0.8      ‘Trainee’ is a person undergoing ADI training.

0.9      ‘Trainer’ is an individual who gives instructor training for one or more parts of the ADI qualifying examination on behalf of the Organisation whether directly or indirectly employed, franchised or contracted.

0.10    ‘Registrar’ is the Registrar of Approved Driving Instructors.

1.      AIMS and OBJECTIVES

1.1      The aim of the ORDIT scheme is to maintain, produce and promote the current Register (and work towards a compulsory Register) of driving instructor training organisations and driving instructor trainers that can be relied upon by the public, the driver training industry and the Driving Standards Agency to provide good quality training by qualified trainers, from premises that are ORDIT inspected and meet satisfactory standards and from organisations that have agreed to abide by the terms and conditions of the scheme.

1.2      The main objectives of the ORDIT scheme are to ensure that:

1.2.1   Satisfactory standards of training are available for members of the public wishing to qualify as Approved Driving Instructors (ADIs);

1.2.2   Satisfactory standards of training are available for ADIs who wish to receive further training or re‑training;

1.2.3   All trainers delivering training under the scheme have been tested by the DSA and accepted as being suitable for entry onto the Register;

1.2.4   Any person seeking training with an organisation or individual whose details are entered in the Register should be protected from unfair business practices and inferior training;

1.2.5   Those organisations, premises and trainers that are successfully ORDIT inspected will be promoted through the ORDIT list contained within the DSA’s Starter Pack for potential ADIs (ADI 14);

1.2.6   The DSA and the ADI consultative organisations will only promote those organisations, premises and individual trainers entered on the Register;

1.2.7   Only those organisations, premises and trainers entered onto the Register are entitled to display ORDIT certificates/badges to help the public recognise them;

1.2.8   Any course offered by ORDIT Members shall be genuinely adequate for the purpose of enabling a trainee to pass the ADI qualifying examination.

2.      CODE OF PRACTICE

Those on the Register must: -

2.1      Clearly inform all prospective Trainees in writing of the services provided, with particular reference to the Trainers qualification, costs, venue, duration and content in relation to the ADI examination structure.

2.2      Inform prospective Trainees of the Organisation’s terms of business and complaints procedure.

2.3      Take all reasonable care, skill and diligence in providing training in all relevant aspects of traffic and driver education needed to pass the ADI qualifying examinations, taking into account individual training needs and safety.

2.4      Not disclose to a third party any information given by a Trainee during training or training progress or driving and instructional ability except where under obligation in Law or with the DSA as part of an ORDIT inspection or with a third party who is paying for a Trainee’s training but subject to the Trainee’s knowledge.

2.5      Ensure all vehicles used in training are maintained in a safe and satisfactory condition, properly insured, taxed and where appropriate certified as roadworthy.

2.6      Apply an honest, moral and professional approach in all business practice and avoid improper language, suggestion or physical contact with Trainees as well as maintaining proper standards of personal hygiene and dress.

2.7      Comply with all current legislation particularly in respect of business premises and practice, staff, vehicles and public liability.

3.      ADVERTISING AND PROMOTIONAL CODE OF PRACTICE

3.1      All advertising shall fully comply with the best practice, as defined by current Codes of Practice issued by the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), in the spirit as well as the letter.

3.2      All advertising shall be legal, decent, honest truthful and prepared with a sense of responsibility to both trainees and competitors as well as respecting the principles of fair-trading and competition.

3.3      Any claim made in advertising shall be able to be substantiated objectively by documentary evidence, which shall be made available for inspection upon request.

3.4      The full terms of any guarantee shall be given in writing before any training course agreement is signed.

3.5      Members of the Register convicted of any trading standards or fair trading offence, or having an adjudication made against them by the Advertising Standards Authority, shall have their continued membership of ORDIT reviewed by the ADI Registrar, who shall have the power to remove that person or Organisation from the Register.

3.6      The ADI Registrar shall retain the right to demand timely changes to the advertising of any Organisation or Trainer following ASA, OFT or Trading Standards rulings with the ultimate sanction of exclusion from the Register.

3.7      The ADI Registrar shall retain the right to demand timely changes to the advertising of any Organisation or Trainer in the case of it not being covered by any regulatory body.

3.8      The ADI Registrar reserves the right, but not the duty, to make a complaint about a member’s advertising (in whatever form) to the appropriate regulatory body if in his opinion such material does not satisfy the above criteria in 3.1 through to 3.4. As an alternative to such a complaint being raised the member may elect to immediately remove the offending material and thus potentially avoid such action being taken.

4.      CRITERIA

4.1    General

4.1.1   ORDIT registration and ORDIT Trainer qualifications shall be for a period of two years.

4.1.2   Organisations applying to join or remain on the Register must have at least 60% of their Trainers successfully ORDIT qualified for either Part 2 or Part 3 training both overall and at each Premises. All the remaining Trainers must either be ORDIT qualified for Part 1 or be Prospective Trainers (and therefore fully comply with 4.11 below). In the case of a two-man organisation, a ratio of 50% will be acceptable. Once on the Register, should the 60% or 50% rule be breached by resignation or failure at re-inspection, the Organisation has 21 days in which to re-submit for inspection a trainer, so as to meet the criteria, without losing their ORDIT status. Failure to do so will result in the Organisation being removed from the Register.

4.1.3   Organisations must abide by these Terms and Conditions of Membership as stated in this document.

4.1.4   Organisations must apply for re-inspection of each of their Premises and Trainers (who are also jointly responsible) at least three months prior to the expiry of their ORDIT registration periods. An Organisations Trainers names will be recorded beside the Premises at which they mainly work.

4.1.5   All training must be properly structured to prepare Trainees for giving driving instruction and include all items on the DSA syllabus.

4.2    Organisations and Premises

4.2.1   Organisations must have a specified business address where training records are kept and a contact point, which will be made available for anyone with a legitimate complaint. P.O. Boxes are not acceptable for use in the Register but can be used as a trading address on letters etc.

4.2.2   Organisations must offer training for all three parts of the ADI qualifying examination.

4.2.3   Organisations may operate from more than one Premises and upon successful inspection each Premises will be listed on the Register under the Organisations’ name.

4.2.4   “Premises only” inspections will be dealt with on merit and on a “case by case” basis. Acceptance of these premises shall be at the discretion of the ADI Registrar. For example, an Organisation may move to new premises.

4.3    Course programme and Trainee instructor records

4.3.1   The Organisation must be able to demonstrate that the course and training provided for each part of the ADI qualifying examination are adequate. In particular, all the principles of good structured training should be adhered too and evident from the training records maintained (see 4.5.6, 4.6.3 and 4.7.2 for more details). Information to support this may be required before the inspection of any of the Premises of the Organisation or its Trainers.

4.3.2   On an inspection initial interview records, assessment, training and progress records may be inspected.

4.4    Minimum Trainer qualifications

4.4.1   The minimum qualification required by a Trainer applying for an ORDIT inspection is to have been an ADI for a minimum period of twelve months.

4.5    Criteria for the ADI theory training

4.5.1   Organisations will be asked to specify on their ORDIT application how ADI theory training is carried out and to nominate which Trainers conduct it.

4.5.2   Trainers only ORDIT inspected for ADI theory classroom training must not undertake any Part 2 or Part 3 training (unless this is done as part of any Prospective Trainer scheme as defined later under item 4.11).

4.5.3   Each Trainer who passes an ORDIT inspection for ADI theory classroom training will be listed in the Register as qualified to deliver Part 1 classroom training (i.e. P1C). The Trainers’ name will appear in the Register under the name of the Organisation and the Premises that they primarily work from.

4.5.4   If only distance learning is provided the name of the Trainer or Trainers responsible for controlling and monitoring ADI theory training will be listed in the Register to deliver Part 1 training (i.e. P1 D) under the name of the Organisation and the Premises that they primarily work from. Such nominees must already be ORDIT qualified to give either Part 2 or Part 3 training.

4.5.5   Training in preparation for the theory test is acceptable in either classroom or distance learning format or a combination of both. However, when distance learning is used the Organisation must have a system for monitoring Trainee instructors’ progress and providing feedback. Just providing Trainees with a copy of the DSA databank or other similar mock exam questions and the standard reference books will not be considered adequate.

4.5.6   The training for the ADI theory test should be properly structured with clearly defined aims and objectives. The training programme should cover a suitable syllabus for the ADI theory test. The progress of each Trainee instructor should be carefully monitored and formally recorded for the benefit of the Trainee instructor and the Trainer alike. Each Trainee ADI theory test exam result should also be recorded whether they are a pass or fail.

4.5.7   The DSA Inspector may require to see the ADI theory distance learning materials (if any) and/or details of the ADI theory training course, including any progress monitoring system, in advance of the formal inspection of the individual Premises or the Organisation depending upon how the ADI theory training is delivered.

4.5.8   The DSA Inspector may at an ORDIT inspection require to see one of the Trainers carrying out theory classroom training or alternatively review the distance learning material with the Trainer responsible for ADI theory training within that Premises or Organisation.

4.6    Criteria for Part 2 (Driving Ability) training

4.6.1   Trainers ORDIT inspected for Part 2 only training must not undertake any Part 3 training (unless this is done as part of any Prospective Trainer scheme as defined below under section 4.11).

4.6.2   Each Trainer who passes a Part 2 ORDIT inspection will be listed in the Register as qualified to deliver Part 2 training. The Trainers’ name will appear in the Register under the name of the Organisation and/or the Premises that they primarily work from.

4.6.3   The training for the second part of the ADI qualifying examination should be properly structured with clearly defined aims and objectives. The training programme should be designed to identify and eliminate any driving faults of the Trainee instructor. The progress of each Trainee instructor should be carefully monitored and formally recorded for the benefit of the Trainee and the Trainer alike. Each Trainee instructor’s Part 2 exam results should also be recorded whether they are a pass or fail.

4.6.4   The DSA Inspector may require to see the Part 2 distance learning materials (if any) and/or details of the Part 2 course, including any progress monitoring system, in advance of the formal inspection of the individual Premises or the Organisation depending upon how the Part 2 training is delivered. In this way the Inspector can view each individual Part 2 Trainers performance in the context of the training programme as a whole.

4.7    Criteria for Part 3 (Instructional Ability) training

4.7.1   All Trainers wishing to deliver Part 3 training must be ORDIT qualified to deliver Part 3 training (unless they are a Part 3 Prospective Trainer as defined below under section 4.11). Trainers successfully ORDIT inspected for Part 3 will automatically be qualified to deliver Part 2 training. On each alternate inspection the Trainer may elect to be inspected for Part 2 rather than for Part 3 if they so wish. Each Trainer who passes a Part 3 ORDIT inspection will be listed in the Register as qualified for delivering training for Part 3 and Part 2. The Trainers’ name will appear in the Register under the name of the Organisation and the Premises that they primarily work from.

4.7.2   The training for Part 3 should be properly structured with clearly defined aims and objectives. The training programme should be designed to help the Trainee instructor develop each of the skills and cover each of the topics necessary to pass the third part of the ADI qualifying examination. A dual-controlled training car must be available to the Trainee so that use of dual controls can be covered. The progress of each Trainee instructor should be carefully monitored and formally recorded for the benefit of the Trainee and the Trainer alike. Each Trainee’s Part 3 exam results should also be recorded whether they are a pass or fail.

4.7.3   The DSA Inspector may require to see the Part 3 distance learning materials (if any) and/or details of the Part 3 course, including any progress monitoring system, in advance of the formal inspection of the individual Premises or the Organisation depending upon how the Part 3 training is delivered. In this way the Inspector can view each individual Part 3 Trainers performance in the context of the training programme as a whole.

4.8    In-Car Training Ratios

4.8.1   During a training session for Part 2 or Part 3 no more than two Trainees and/or one Prospective Trainer to one Trainer is permitted in the car.

4.9    First inspection and entry onto the Register

Before an Organisation, its Premises and its Trainers can be placed on the Register the following must be satisfied:-

4.9.1 Organisations must demonstrate to the DSA that the course training programme, assessment system and general training records are sufficient to professionally train someone to pass all parts of the ADI qualifying examination as part of any Premises inspection. .

4.9.2   Each Premises used for training purposes, that the Organisation requires to be listed on the Register, must be properly equipped with training resources and classroom facilities, toilet facilities and meet appropriate Health and Safety regulations.

4.9.3   Organisations applying to join the Register must have Premises available from which to offer training and at least 60% of Trainers must be ORDIT qualified for either Part 2 or Part 3 training, both overall and at each Premises. All the remaining Trainers must either be ORDIT qualified for Part 1 or be a Prospective Trainer (and therefore fully comply with 4.11 below).

4.9.4   If an Organisation fails in its attempt to join the Register it may reapply as soon as it considers the reasons for the failure have been rectified. Successfully inspected Trainers would not need to be re-­inspected within two years from the date of their inspection.

4.9.5   The Principal of the Organisation must sign a copy of this document signifying their acceptance of these terms and conditions on behalf of the Organisation.

4.10  Re-inspection and retention of ORDIT Membership

To maintain ORDIT membership the Organisation must:-

4.10.1 Pass a full Premises inspection every two years at each of its Premises, which must be applied for at least three months before the expiration of the previous two-year period. If a successful inspection occurs before the expiration of the previous period, the new two-year period will commence on its expiration. If an Organisation fails its first Premises inspection it must rectify the reasons for its failure and re-apply for a second inspection within 28 days of being notified of its previous failure. If it fails a second Premises inspection the ADI Registrar will review its Membership and may suspend or remove the Organisation and its Premises from the Register.

4.10.2 Premises inspections shall include inspection of classroom facilities (if available), training and trainee facilities, teaching materials (books videos), training course programme and Trainee assessment system (also see 4.9.2).

4.10.3 Ensure its Trainers are re-inspected every two years in accordance with the appropriate training criteria 4.5, 4.6 and 4.7.

4.10.4 Ensure that any Trainer who fails their first inspection attempt applies for a second inspection within 21 days of being notified by the DSA of the first inspection result.

4.10.5 Ensure that any Trainer who fails their second inspection attempt applies for a third and final inspection within 21 days of being notified by the DSA of the second inspection result.

4.10.6 Cease to use the services of any Trainer who fails their third inspection attempt immediately on being notified of the inspection result by the DSA. Any Trainer who fails a third attempt at any particular part will no longer be ORDIT qualified to give training for that part and will have their name removed from the Register in regards to that part only.

4.10.7 Any Trainer who fails a third inspection attempt cannot become a Prospective Trainer or apply for another inspection for one year from the date when the third inspection was undertaken.

4.10.8 Ensure at all times that at least 60% of Trainers are fully ORDIT qualified for either Part 2 or Part 3 training, both overall and at each Premises. All the remaining Trainers must either be ORDIT qualified for Part 1 or be a Prospective Trainer (and therefore fully comply with 4.11 below).

4.11  Temporary Prospective Trainers Scheme

This scheme is only a temporary measure and may be changed or removed in the near future once sufficient numbers of ORDIT qualified Trainers exist.

4.11.1        General

Up to a maximum of 40% of an Organisations Trainers (50% for single person organisation) at any one time may be Prospective Trainers who are trainers able to give unsupervised driving instructor training for specified parts of the ADI qualifying examination as defined below within ORDIT rules prior to passing their ORDIT inspection. Unsupervised training is that given by a Prospective Trainer when not under the direct supervision of an appropriately ORDIT qualified Trainer. In the event of the Organisation using any Prospective Trainer there must be a minimum of one qualified Trainer for each part that any Prospective Trainer gives training for.

4.11.2        Prospective Part 1 Trainers

All Trainers giving Part 1 training must be nominated as such by the Organisation and any Trainer giving Part 1 classroom training before being inspected and passing an ORDIT inspection for Part 1 classroom training must be a Part 2 or Part 3 ORDIT qualified Trainer and be certified as able to give the training by the Organisation and have applied to the DSA for a Part 1 inspection by recorded delivery post.

4.11.3        Prospective Part 2 Trainers

4.11.3.1 A Prospective Part 2 Trainer able to give Part 2 training before being inspected and passing an ORDIT inspection for this must have been an ADI for one year, be certified as suitable to give Part 2 training by the Organisation and to have applied for an ORDIT inspection for Part 2 by guaranteed postal delivery of which proof of posting may be required by the DSA.

4.11.3.2 If the Prospective Part 2 Trainer fails a first or second Part 2 inspection the Organisation must either cease to use the Prospective Trainer for Part 2 training or ensure they have applied for a further inspection within 21 days of being notified by the DSA of the inspection result.

4.11.3.3 If the Prospective Part 2 Trainer fails a third Part 2 inspection the Organisation must cease to use the Trainer and the Trainer may not apply to be a Prospective Trainer for one year from the date of the failed inspection but the Trainer may retake the Part 2 inspection providing no further unsupervised training is given.

4.11.4        Prospective Part 3 Trainers

4.11.4.1 A Prospective Part 3 Trainer able to give Part 3 training before being inspected and passing an ORDIT inspection for this must be an ORDIT qualified Part 2 Trainer, be certified as suitable to give Part 3 training by the Organisation and to have applied for an ORDIT inspection for Part 3 by guaranteed postal delivery of which proof of posting may be required by the DSA.

4.11.4.2 If the Prospective Trainer fails a first attempt at Part 3 the Organisation must immediately cease to use the Prospective Trainer for Part 3 training, for reward or alternatively unsupervised, until he or she has passed a Part 3 inspection. However, they may continue to give Part 2 training and apply for further Part 3 inspections.

4.12  Trainers moving between ORDIT registered organisations

4.12.1 ORDIT qualified Trainers may move between ORDIT registered organisations, providing the registration of both is current.

4.12.2 Responsibility lies with both the Organisation and the Trainer leaving to inform the ORDIT Secretariat of such circumstances within 21 days of the event.

4.12.3 If a fully ORDIT qualified Trainer at the Part 3 level wishes to leave an ORDIT organisation to set up their own organisation, then they must follow the procedures laid down in 4.9 except that they would not necessarily need to be individually inspected as a trainer provided their inspection expiry date had not been exceeded.

4.13  No Part 3 ORDIT qualified Trainers

4.13.1 If the Organisation has no qualified ORDIT Trainers registered at the Part 3 level the Organisation will be suspended from membership of ORDIT until they have an ORDIT qualified Part 3 Trainer registered.

4.14  Failure to comply with scheme:

4.14.1 If an Organisation or Trainer fails to comply with these Terms and Conditions of Membership, Codes of Practice or Criteria, the Registrar, after considering representations as appropriate, may remove or suspend an Organisation, its Premises or a Trainer from the Register.

4.14.2 Appeals against a decision of the Registrar to take action against an establishment will need to be made within 14 days of the written confirmation of the decision being issued. Such appeals should be addressed to DSA’s Chief Driving Examiner who will deal with such appeals by means of written correspondence only. The Chief Driving Examiner will have the power to either overturn or accept the decision of the Registrar or to alter any time limits that have been imposed.

5.      BUSINESS CODE OF PRACTICE

An organisation shall:

5.1      Provide a full copy of their training course contract or agreement and any other associated terms and conditions and give an opportunity for any prospective Trainee to study them away from the Premises and seek independent advice, if so desired, before they are required to sign any document or make any payment.

5.2      Have a refund policy in circumstances where a Trainee cannot continue with the course at the time or at any reasonable time in the future on serious medical grounds confirmed in writing by a doctor that prevents them from being able to drive or instruct and such refund shall be limited to the savings that an Organisation would make by not having to deliver the remainder of the training course in accordance with the Guidance on refunds provided by the Office of Fair Trading.

5.3      Have a refund policy in the event of the Trainee failing three attempts at Part Two of the ADI examination providing that each exam was taken in good faith by the Trainee and provided any free remedial training offered by the Organisation prior to the failed attempts is taken and such refund shall be limited to the savings that an Organisation would make by not having to deliver the remainder of the training course in accordance with the Guidance on refunds provided by the Office of Fair Trading.

5.4      Have a refund policy in the event of the Trainee being refused their application for registration by the DSA provided the Trainee had not deliberately withheld or falsely stated any relevant information as part of their application to attend the course and provided it was not as the result of any event or incident following commencement of the training course and such refund shall be limited to the savings that an Organisation would make by not having to deliver the remainder of the training course in accordance with the Guidance on refunds provided by the Office of Fair Trading.

5.5      The refund policy must provide for an automatic and prompt refund to the Trainee for any ADI examination, trainee license or registration fees paid to the Organisation whether identified separately or inclusive in the overall training course fee. The Trainee’s entitlement to this money, at anytime upon their written request, should be clearly stated in the course contract or agreement. If the fees are paid on behalf of the Trainee by the Organisation it will be deemed that these fees have been collected as part of the fee for the training and subject to the terms of this clause.

I, as an authorised signatory for the Organisation, confirm that we will abide by the above Terms and Conditions of ORDIT Membership and any notified changes to those Terms and Conditions provided such changes are only made after proper consultation with the members of ORDIT and provided sufficient time to implement such changes is allowed. The Organisation appreciates that if the Organisation or one of its Trainers fails to comply with these Terms and Conditions of Membership, the Organisation, its Premises or its Trainers may be removed or suspended from the Register following a full and proper investigation by the Registrar having given the Organisation an opportunity to put its own view in writing and to attend any such hearing.

Signed by:   Date:

for and on behalf of

the Organisation:            

Named Principal:

(Rev Sept 04)


Section six

What to do next

Start by gathering as much information as you can, (you might need it in court). Gather records of what was said and promised, get names of individuals in the area that might have heard the conversation, make copies of all paperwork and keep it safe.

Get a list of anyone else within the establishment that is also having the same difficulties as you.  Individually you will seldom win; with a group you stand a better chance of winning.

You are not alone, inform others that you are being threatened and stick together.

Inform the DSA, if they get enough complaints then they might start acting on your behalf.

The contents of this document are for the benefit of the individual seeking to become a driving instructor.  It is not my intention to make any references to individual instructor training establishments or individual driving schools.

Any references to individual training establishments or driving schools are purely coincidental.  No offence is intended.

I wish you the very best of luck

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